Of Snowdrops and Snowflakes

Feb 11, 2013 | 0 comments

(Saturday, February 9, 2013 — posted late due to technical difficulties)

SnowdropsFor several days, the weather has been bright and cold here in Oysterville and last evening’s discussion among the Friday Nighters turned to snow.  Several of us had happened to drive through Seaview early-ish on Thursday and had seen the slushy remains of snow along the verges and in the valleys of the roofs.  Not hail.  Snow!

We all remarked how dark and threatening the sky had been at that end of the Peninsula in sharp contrast to our sunshiny outlook just fifteen or twenty miles north.  That’s not an unusual phenomenon here at the beach.  Not that we are always the ones in the banana belt, but the sharp contrasts in the weather from one mile to the next are the norm, especially at this time of year.

The talk of snow and snowflakes led several of our guests to a spirited discussion about snowdrops.  Apparently those little blossoms are just coming on in the gardens here. Bradley had mentioned them to me yesterday, too, and I’m sure I nodded and smiled vaguely just as I did last night.  I had to confess that I didn’t have a clue about them and I was quite sure (though I didn’t mention it, thank goodness) that I had never seen one.

“There are thousands of varieties,” Kathleen Sayce said.  “ Galanthus is their botanical name and, in fact, there is a society of ‘galanthophiles’ who collect and hybridize the seeds.”

As usual, I was impressed by all the things other folks know about that I remain blank on.  But, when Kathleen later sent me a link to the Pacific Bulb Society’s information on Galanthus, complete with photographs, all I could think was, “Oh!  Those!”

Little did I know that ‘snowdrops’ are those sweet little white blossoms that are coming up between the daffodils along the church fence.  I’m always so excited that the daffodils are on their way that I pay no attention at all to the snowdrops.  Duh!

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