Last night it was ghost peppers…

May 31, 2014 | 1 comment

A Friday Night Offering

A Friday Night Offering

Friday nights at our house are a never-ending source of entertainment and education. Not that I really learn anything substantive on a regular basis. But I often learn about something new to me. (And there is a difference between ‘learning’ and ‘learning about.’) Last night it was ghost peppers.

It’s becoming predictable that when Steve and Martie join our gathering, there will be an unusual topic added to the discussion. Not too long ago it was Bitcoins, also called cryptocurrency or digital currency. I never did wrap my head around whether they were real or virtual and Steve has promised to give me one when he can figure out how.

Friday Night

Friday Night

Last night we were catching up with the latest information on retail outlets for marijuana in Pacific County. Apparently there will be only two and it looks as though both will be in Raymond – not on the Peninsula, even though the majority of the county’s population is here.

Then we got off on the banking situation. It has been iffy as to whether federally insured banks could open accounts for the producers and sellers of pot since it is still illegal by federal law. That, of course, led back to bitcoins and, somehow, to the idea that the State of Washington should open a bank and that Tokeland would be the perfect location.

Friday Nighters Some More

Friday Nighters Some More

Some way the conversation then took a turn to ghost peppers and the Scoville Scale for measuring hotness. It was Steve who brought them up. I think he said he wants to grow some but I wasn’t listening very carefully. I went to high school with a guy named David Scoville and my mind had taken another turn.

I did hear the part about ghost peppers being four hundred times as hot as tabasco and measuring a million Scoville heat units and that you have to wear gloves to handle them.   Being a bit of a weenie when it comes to heavy-duty hotness, I could only think “Why? Why would you want to deal with anything that hot and even think of ingesting it?”

Ghost Peppers

Ghost Peppers

My mind wandered once more – back to the 1970s in California when my friend Al Barela invited me to a meal typical of what he had grown up with in New Mexico. His mom had sent the chilies but he assured us that he had cut them ‘way back’ from what the recipe called for. Even so, I couldn’t taste anything but pain. I remember him telling about one of his young cousins who asked at a family dinner, “Why do we always eat food that makes the tears fall down our faces?” Al thought that was hysterical. Me too, but not in a funny way…

1 Comment

  1. Greg

    No, that look on my face wasn’t brought about by tasting a ghost pepper. Nor by gastrointestinal distress, for that matter.

    Reply

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