Big Bad Wolves North of Oysterville?

Dec 15, 2012 | 14 comments

The conversation around the dinner table at our neighbor’s a few nights ago took a north turn up toward Stackpole Road.  It seems that there is some sort of wolf rescue operation going on up there.  It’s not about local wolves, of course.  As far any of us ‘old-timers’ know, there have never been wolves on the Long Beach Peninsula.  But, apparently, now there are.

Rumor has it that this is an operation called “Never Cry Wolf Rescue and Adoptions (NCWR&A)” out of the Sacramento area in California.  The animals include both wolves and half-wolves that have been abused or abandoned by pet-owners.

According to their mission statement NCWR&A is a non-profit public benefit corporation which exists to rescue and nurture wolves and wolf-hybrids that have been abused or abandoned, and to educate the public of the myths and poor treatment of these beautiful animals.  Their goal is to rehabilitate the domesticated wolves and wolf dogs and give them a second chance.

Lordy, lordy!  Didn’t we just go through the bear feeding and relocation trauma out Stackpole Road way?  And now it’s wolves!  Next we’ll be seeing that little girl in the red cape and hood making her way to grandma’s house.  Or maybe we’ll see her cousin, Robin.  There’s already a large wooded area nearby called “Sherwood Forest.”  Reality and fantasy seem intertwined north of Oysterville!

In an effort to see for ourselves and perhaps to talk to the “rescuers” for the straight scoop (like is it true that they were kicked out of California?), Nyel and I took a little drive toward the Point yesterday.  Unfortunately, our directions to the location were fuzzy and we came back none the wiser.  Later we were told, “It’s not off Stackpole Road, but west of there.  And the wolf compound looks not like a habitat situation, but like a dog kennel…”

As far as I could learn online, nothing in Washington state law prevents people from keeping wolf hybrids.  On the other hand, this was posted:  Summary of Law: No person may possess or breed a potentially dangerous animal after July, 2007. A potentially dangerous animal includes but not limited to Large cats, wolves, bears, hyenas, non-human primates, elephants, alligators, crocodiles, water monitors, crocodile monitors; and various species of venomous snakes.

I don’t want to be accused of sounding the “not in my backyard” alarm, but it does seem to me that our dear old peninsula is becoming a sort of sanctuary for the unloved and unwanted.  There is undoubtedly a balance, and the words “full disclosure” and “transparency” leap to mind.  Or maybe we just haven’t been paying good enough attention…

14 Comments

  1. Stephanie Frieze

    The Peninsula being small in relative terms, I would not think that there was enough wild resources for wolves and that they will resort to eating pets and chickens. I like wolves and it is true that in many ways the Peninsula has been a haven for the unloved and outsiders, but I’m not sure that there are enough resources for wolves without infringing on the people. I hope they will relocate this pack, if in fact it is a pact, to somewhere more remote.

    Reply
    • sydney

      As I understand it, this wolf rescue area is well-fenced and the wolves live in enclosure and are provided with kennels — much like a dog rescue situation. I don’t think there’s any pretense of duplicating “natural habitat” or of returning these animals to the wild. Nor will they be competing for wild resources — unless, of course, they get loose. My understanding is they are fed and cared for and re-trained so that they can be returned to a domestic environment.

      Reply
  2. Kathleen Shaw

    We have had Wolf Haven International here in Thurston County for thirty years. There has been controversy only over board vs director politics and whether one particular old wolf actually needed to be euthanized when he was. Other than that, there have been zero–read zero–complaints regarding the wolves themselves or potential for escape. I have friends who have lived near there and they never said they were frightened. The wolves available to be seen in the “touring” area will never be released to homes or the wild; the reasons why are carefully explained. There is an active Mexican gray wolf and a red wolf recovery program; these areas are off-limits to the public. I encourage everyone to check out their website, http://www.wolfhaven.org/index.php, to learn more.

    After all, there may not be wild wolves loose on the Peninsula, but there are always coyotes–and even cougars. It’s always been that way, and it always will.

    Reply
    • sydney

      According to what I’ve been told, Never Cry Wolf Rescue is not affiliated with Wolf Haven International nor does it have anything in common with it, other than both organizations deal with wolves. Apples and Oranges. As for coyotes, bears, and cougars — yes, they have ‘always’ been here in our wilds here on the Long Beach Peninsula.. Wolves, no. Plus, these are not “wild” wolves being given safe haven while they recover from something that happened to them in ttheir natural habitat.. Nor are they orphaned wolves found in the wild.. As I understand it, they are wolves that have been rescued from people who were trying to domesticate them. And not people from here. These are wolves being brought in to our area by this rescue organization. According to their website, it is not the intent of Never Cry Wolf to “return” these animals to the wild, but to re-train them and educate potential foster parents so that they can be returned to a domestic (ie family) situation. But, as I mentioned in my blog, I have yet to talk with the property owners,themselves. So… stay tuned. And for more information, check out http://www.nevercrywolfrescue.com.

      Reply
      • Kathleen Shaw

        Wolves make lousy pets, wolf hybrids even more so. Good grief.

        Reply
  3. Susanne Chase

    We took it upon ourselves to adopt one of Never Cry Wolf”s rescued animals 8 years ago. Generally, I agree that wolves should not be bred with dogs…but they have been and they still are. They are the greatest family members one could ever wish for. They are not pets, they are full family members and they require more attention than most humans. They require regular exercise and at least one family member devoted to these animals 24/7. We’re blessed to have had this experience. Thank you Never Cry Wolf for your devotion and caring for these incredible animals.

    Reply
    • sydney

      Thanks for your comment, Susanne. I’m curious about where you live. Perhaps that makes a difference.

      Reply
      • Susanne Chase

        Sidney, We live in Marin County…sound familier. I’m a Redwood High School grad. Oysterville, sounds like a beautiful spot.

        Reply
  4. Tom & Karen Smith

    Hi Sydney,

    Not only has this been a discussion around your dining room table but has caused countless hours of research, postage and phone calls for a number of the neighboring residents.There is so much information surrounding this issue at this point that we cannot possibly discuss it in this format but would be willing to talk with you next time we are in Oysterville. It has resulted in legal action taken by the county (in which we the residents prevailed after 3 months) and is still surrounded by legal action to yet be decided.

    This is a serious problem in our community and needs to be stopped. We have kept a low profile so as not to jeopardize the county’s efforts at this point. We are not at liberty to tell you our plans but would be willing to discuss what has happened thus far.

    Tom and Karen Smith

    Reply
    • sydney

      It sounds as though the residents of W Lane have the situation well in hand. Neighborhood differences are always difficult to resolve — especially in rural areas where there aren’t many ‘degrees of separation’ and we hear about what’s happening almost instantly. We wish all the parties involved the best resolution possible.

      Reply
  5. Lyric Larcom

    Hi Sydney, I live in Oysterville and know that first off NCWR’s presence has affected nothing. These “complaints” have been nearly unheard by me. I have in fact heard excitement from many people on the peninsula. I think its a good thing, its not affecting anyone and the wolves have a good home here in my opinion. Please don’t make a problem out of nothing. Especially off of rumors that you hear, you aren’t in high school so don’t act like it.

    Reply
  6. Dan & Nikki Spiegel

    In the first part of June 2015 Nikki and I physically saw a large wolf dog in the area of 347/G St (Surfside) in the late night time frame. What alerted us to the wolf was that it pushed over our barbecue. We went outside and both of us saw it. At first we thought it might have been a bear but “No” is was a large black or dark wolf looking animal.

    Reply
  7. Dan & Nikki Spiegel

    Just one last thought. We are aware of and like the wildlife on the Peninsula. We are also respectful and cautious of its presence.

    Reply
  8. Sam Blake

    You can’t fix stupid so why try.

    Reply

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