1869 Sensibilities and 2015 Amenities

Aug 21, 2015 | 8 comments

Old Technology

        Old Technology

The shiplap siding on our 1869 house is redwood. The lumber was milled in California and was shipped north as ballast on an oyster schooner, there being no mill in the area at the time. I don’t know if the homeowner, Tom Crellin, realized that his choice of lumber would have so many benefits and would last so long.

I think all of the siding on the main house is original – only the garage end may be another material. Over the years the homeowners have been careful to maintain the integrity of the siding and, in our turn, we chose to have the house insulated by blowing insulation into the walls from the inside rather than compromise the siding from without. That was a spendy proposition as it resulted in repapering and repainting every one of our ten rooms.

New Technology, Temporary Placement

New Technology, Temporary Placement

Today we are replacing our twenty-year-old television set with a new-age, flat-screen, high definition model. That involves replacing the 18” satellite dish that is located unobtrusively on the east side of the house, bolted into one of the upright trim pieces. New TV technology requires a 30” replacement dish with a larger footprint that will require four bolts into the siding, itself.

“It could crack the siding,” said the young installer. “Then it’s not an option,” said I.

In the ensuing conversation I learned that the dish cannot go on our roof because we have wooden shingles. A roof-mounted satellite dish isn’t really an option anyway. Our Oysterville Design Review guidelines suggest that satellite dishes be as unobtrusive as possible – as in unseen from the street. “Or,” said the young installation expert, “you could have a free-standing dish on a four foot metal pole.”

Sign of the Times

Sign of the Times

He showed me pictures of that possibility. It would be a stretch to call the monstrosity “yard art” but when we learned that it could be located as much as a hundred feet from the house and partially hidden in the rhododendrons, we were quite pleased. There are a few more hoops to jump through first, though. The PUD has to check to see that there are no underground wires in the area that will be trenched for the TV cable. Next the trenching. And, last, the final placement of the dish.

Next Thursday we should be good to go. A 2015 satellite receiver for our 146-year-old house! Tom Crellin would be proud!

8 Comments

  1. Stephanie Frieze

    A great compromise!

    Reply
  2. Jim

    You are so modern Syd!

    Reply
    • sydney

      Amen to that!

      Reply
  3. Steve

    Yes, the installer is doing the protocol Directv follows. We have ours on a pole not on the house itself and yes we had to wait for PUD as well. You will see a big difference on television viewing with all the NEW technology. You wont want to go back to the rabbit ears days again.

    Reply
    • sydney

      We watched our for an hour or two last night. We agree that it’s clearer but my eyes aren’t that great anymore, anyway. I was much happier with our old set up.

      Reply
  4. Connie

    Hi Sydney

    I wanted to let you know how much I enjoy your blog, altho I don’t read everyone.
    I so enjoyed the tour you gave thru Grays Harbor College and would do it again…
    It sounds like the Compromise keeps with the wonderful way all of you take such wonderful care of your little community. Thanks for keeping us all informed.

    Take Care

    Reply
    • sydney

      Connie, thank you so much. It was a pleasure to meet you on that tour! I do hope our paths cross again!

      Reply

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