Fake History: A Righteous Discussion Topic

“Plank Road” – from CPHM’s Community Historian webpage

Although our current prez claims he coined the term “fake news,” the little bit of research I’ve done about the origin of that catchy phrase does not corroborate (Surprise! Surprise!) what he says.  No matter.  Whoever came up with that particular descriptor did a great service to us all, as far as I am concerned.  It has rapidly become an aphorism that the general population understands.  Whether it is used properly or not, “fake news” has become a red flag, of sorts.  It helps some of us to think twice or to dig deeper before we take what we hear or read at face value.

Besides that, we now hear about fake-other-stuff and we know immediately that there is a question as to its veracity.  Bravo!  Yesterday, for instance, Betsy Millard, Director of the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum (CPHM) posted an interesting article on the Community Historian Participants at CPHM Facebook page.  It is from the American Association for State and Local History:  “6 Steps to Historical Literacy: Your Guide to History on the Web.”  The introduction said: “Fake News, false stories, misinformation, propaganda—it’s an important time to reinforce critical thinking skills and remind students and citizens not to accept information at face value.”

Teachers’ Institute – Oysterville, 1885

I didn’t see the term “Fake History” but that is what they are saying to be on the lookout for!  I love it!  For years I’ve been lamenting the misinformation that is being propagated about our local history – propagated by some of our most cherished institutions, in fact.  I’ve written in this very blog about the erroneous information published in our local Visitor’s Guide and even posted at the County Historical Society’s museum right across the bay – unfactual information about the founding of Oysterville, a historical event near and dear to my heart.

We’ve talked about other examples of false Pacific County history at our Community Historian gatherings, but we’ve never used the label “fake history.”  Perhaps that terminology will bring more focus to the problem.  I hope so.  What I really hope is that we can concentrate on practical ways of eradicating or correcting some of that fake history – beyond talking to the local perpetuators of such misinformation. Perhaps finding ways to correct articles on Wikipedia (so often the source of misinformation) or… who knows?   I look forward to next year’s discussions.

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